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Moulding Planes A short primer
Cutting Gable-End Siding The fastest method
Cutting HUGE Wooden Crown Molding Sometimes the old tricks are the best tricks.
Installing Baseboard How to identify and cut inside and outside corners—both miters and copes.
Bottom Stair Post and Stringer Deck Connections
Nip & Tuck 22 1/2° Wall Returns
Out-of-sight Exterior Pocket Doors
The Katz Roadshow Pencil Dispenser
Track Saw Tutorial Quickly Ripping Plywood

TIC Merchandise

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Stabila R-Beam Levels

For my first ten or fifteen years in carpentry, Stabila levels were mythical. Most of the time, you couldn’t even buy one, even if you could afford the hefty price tag. There just weren’t many around—only the most discriminating stores sold them, and they were always in short supply. Today you can buy a Stabila level at every professional tool store and lumber dealer. Read the full article…

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Making Louvered Doors

…with One Router Sled

I live in an old stone barn that was converted to a house in the 1950s. The master bathroom needed a makeover, so I gutted it in preparation for a complete overhaul. I wanted to build a new closet and separated toilet area, both of which needed doors. I decided to build louvered doors out of Mahogany, which would normally cost approximately $600 from an online supplier. Read the full article…

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The DWS780: DeWalt’s New 12-in. Slider

As carpenters, we rely on our miter saws to help us do fast, accurate work. Our cut stations are the heart of our jobsite setups. It comes as no surprise that we expect a lot out of these tools—we are continually on the lookout for a saw that is precisely calibrated, feels natural, operates strong and smooth, offers large cutting capacity, and doesn’t weigh a ton. No single saw satisfies these criteria perfectly, and the new DWS780 is no exception. Read the full article…

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Installing a Commercial Steel Door

About six years ago, I remodeled an Avis car rental office. Prior to the remodel, the office had a showroom of cars on display, complete with showroom-style glass so that the cars could be seen from the road. Avis wanted to give the office a softer, more residential look, so the glass was removed, a wall was framed, and double-hung windows and vinyl cedar shake siding were installed. At the time, I figured my only option was to install a metal residential door—a typical one you’d find in a home, made of galvanized light-gauge steel—and a wood frame. I didn’t know I could get a raised panel commercial steel door with glass back then! Read the full article…

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Grate Idea!

When the old timers changed their homes from fireplace and stove heating, they used gravity hot air, steam, or hot water. Gravity hot air required large return air ducts in the floor, so they put a metal bottom on a joist space to create a duct. Code guys today would have a heart attack to see that done. These large returns needed a cover in the floor, and usually those covers were made out of wood. Read the full article…

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My New Home: Choosing a Contractor

Early last winter, after searching for more than two years, I finally found a new home in Oregon, outside of Medford, near the small town of Ruch. It took a long time to find this place because I couldn’t decide where I wanted to live and once I did, I had a hard time finding a place I could afford—a small, older home that hadn’t been remodeled. After the “big boom,” houses like that became pretty rare. Read the full article…

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