Subscribe to RSS Feed
Subscribe to TIC
Pattern Books from Andersen Windows
Waterproof Windows with HydroGap
SawGear A Second Look
The Quarter-Quarter-Quarter Drawer System One set-up to make all the cuts needed to build drawer boxes.
The 'New' K5 Kreg Jig A tool for professionals
Kreg Foreman VS Kreg Foreman A head-to-head tool review
Victorian Window Head Critical components of production carpentry
Fast-acting Glue A tool-free glue that's fast and dependable
Track Saw Tutorials Trimming a door bottom, back beveling a door, and beveling shelves

TIC Merchandise

trimming-door-bottom-thumbnail

Track Saw Tutorials

Trimming a door bottom, back beveling a door, and beveling shelves

I recently worked on a video series for Festool in which I covered examples of how you might use a Festool track saw in a shop or on the jobsite. In the following videos, I demonstrate how a track saw produces exceptional results when trimming down doors, how using a track saw can save time and additional steps when back beveling a door, and how a track saw offers a better solution than a table saw for making complex bevel or miter cuts.  Read the full article…

Dscf0118-glue-1

Fast-acting Glue

A tool-free glue that’s fast and dependable

Years ago, FastCap introduced a revolutionary fast-acting glue that sets in about 10-15 sec. and is virtually unbreakable. Most of you are probably already familiar with 2p-10. In case you’re not… (Stay tuned for a brief overview of the NEW 2P-10 at the end of this article!) Read the full article…

IMG_6238-1

Victorian Window Head

For the last six or seven years, I’ve included some type of architectural trim presentation during my Finish Carpentry Clinics at Katz Roadshow events. For most of that time, I’ve built a fancy pediment with raking molding joined by a transition piece—a Greek Revival design common throughout the country. You can read more about that pediment in “Greek Revival and Italianate Trim.” Read the full article…

_MG_4532-1

Kreg Foreman VS Kreg Foreman

 

A head-to-head tool review

I’ve used a Kreg pocket hole jig for years. Like a lot of woodworkers and carpenters, pocket holes have changed the way I work and made my job a lot easier. But years ago I grew tired of drilling so many holes by hand, especially when we were doing wainscoting in 30′ x 40′ rooms, one house after another. So I bought a Kreg Foreman. It was a pricey decision, and worth every penny. But now Kreg has come out with a new Foreman and it’s HALF THE PRICE! Read the full article…

_MG_4399-1

The ‘New’ K5 Kreg Jig     

It might not be so new anymore—it took me months to get my hands on the K5 Pocket Hole jig, but it was worth the wait. Years ago, the Kreg Tool Company changed the way we work by popularizing pocket-hole joinery. Since then, they’ve continued to improve on the original model. The new K5 Jig is extremely easy to adjust, comes with a box-full of accessories, and even though most everything is plastic and has that DIYer feel, this is a tool for professionals. Read the full article…

Closeup-1

Waterproof Windows with HydroGap

Some people (mostly folks who live in big cities!) think that builders who live in small towns are behind the curve when it comes to technology and better building practices. But the truth is that every state in the U.S. is actively improving building codes, and through new requirements on everything from decks to framing to air infiltration to housewrap, even small towns in America are getting up to speed. Read the full article…

Adobe Photoshop PDF

Pattern Books from Andersen Windows

I saw my first pattern book while visiting the Huntington Library Rare Books department in 1992 or 93. The book was Designs by Inigo Jones, written by William Kent and published in 1727. By the time I opened that book, I’d been working as a carpenter for more than fifteen years and specializing in finish carpentry for nearly ten years. Looking back, it’s amazing that I was able to survive without any understanding of architectural design, in a profession dependent upon architectural design. Read the full article…

DSC_0431-1

Power Tank C02 Kits

In 2008, I was installing a kitchen every week, on average. As you can probably imagine, I was bringing in a lot of equipment each time to set up shop: miter saw, work bench, table saw, screw guns, levels, and of course nail guns, compressor, hose, and cord—even though there isn’t a lot of need for air guns in kitchen installs, you still need them. Read the full article…

Level-1

Festool CT Wings

The first time I used a Bosch sliding compound miter saw, with up-front bevel lock, I didn’t like the saw at all—it weighed too much. But after working with it for six months, I loved it (as long as someone else would carry it!). And when I first starting using a Kapex, I didn’t like it at all. Other than the fact that I could carry it myself, I just wasn’t comfortable using it. Within a month, I loved it. Tools are like that. You have to use them before you really get to known them, and some you end up loving. Read the full article…

_MG_4372-1

The Chappell Square

A revolutionary approach to a commonly used tool

Every carpenter has his favorite tool—the one he’ll turn the truck around to get because he left it at home. A lot of craftsmen have some kind of antique tool they really don’t use, but think it’s cool to have. (Some of us bought that collectable new!) Just go on eBay and do a search for “collectable carpenters tools.” There are tools online that don’t list a function, because the seller has no idea what it was used for! There are thousands of tools that have come and gone. Some were gadgets that some clever carpenter thought he could retire on; some were replaced with modern technology. My personal test of a tool’s worthiness is whether I would replace it if I lost it or broke it. Read the full article…

Page 1 of 1812345...10...Last »