Subscribe to RSS Feed
Subscribe to TIC

Repairing a Rotten Door Entry

I was on a job recently where I had to completely rework the entry door install on a house. It was difficult to tell from a distance, but the original work had been poorly done (and that might be an understatement!). All of the errors made in that original installation became more and more apparent once I started disassembling the install in order to right the wrongs. Sometimes you have to peel back more than the skin to see how rotten the fruit is at the core. And then you need to take a strategic approach to help that core heal.

The original rotten door entry (Note: Click any image to enlarge)

Peeling the Layers

We started by removing the side casings. This is where we encountered our first issue.

Removing the casings revealed improper weather barrier installation—no flashing was applied (see photos below). On top of that, one of the sides was missing a section of housewrap, leading to rotten sheathing. There was also rot at the bottom corner of the opening.

Of course, if flashing had been incorporated with the housewrap, these problems could have been prevented.

When I removed the pediment, I found that there was another section of housewrap missing; fortunately the damage was superficial and minor.
One of my biggest issues at this point was that the door riser was sealed to the concrete landing. Whenever I see this (and I often do), I always expect to see some rot. I never know how much.

In this case, by sealing the bottom, water had become trapped behind the trim, causing damage to the sheathing and to the rim joist, which was badly rotted.

When I removed the casings I had noticed the bottom corners were bulging out about one inch. After removing the riser, along with the rubber flashing, I found that someone had attempted a repair, but they only made matters worse! They had applied a 1-in. thick insulation board to the structure, further trapping water at the corners.

I also discovered that when they removed the existing riser, they filled in the rotten sheathing with foam insulation, trapping even more water against the rim joist!
My next step was to remove the door unit. I had to pry off the rubber flashing from the top of the bottom opening.
After closely examining the bottom of the door opening, I found that they had added a piece of 3/4-in. plywood over the sub floor in order to raise the door. At this point, I just removed the rotten piece.

I poked at the rim joist when I removed the sheathing and found that it also had to be replaced.

I then removed some more sheathing on both sides in order to cut the rim joist at a solid section.

To remove the damaged section, I cut both ends and removed all the nails securing it. In order to remove the rim joist, which was pinned behind the stoop, I snapped off half of the board’s width. The other half was behind the stoop, so I ran a sawzall behind the board to cut all the nails.
The board then slid out very easily (boy, don’t you just love that!?).
I should mention that it’s always a good idea to clean up after every phase of the job. Cleaning as you work will help you get better results, and it’ll improve your mood, too—working with rotten wood isn’t exactly fun, but keeping the site clean and organized sure helps.

And Now for the Real Job

I began by taking three measurements for my width (middle and both ends), and I went with the smallest one just to be sure the joist would fit.
Then I measured for my length, and cut the joist about an eighth smaller. Doing this allowed me to slide in the rim joist very easily.
I ripped down and cut to length a piece of pressure-treated lumber. I always seal any fresh cuts with a good wood preservative before installing a rim joist.

After tapping in the rim joist, and securing it to the floor joists, I added metal plates to tie the repaired section to the existing rim joist. Since the stoop was placed up against the rim joist, I also added a piece of self-adhesive flashing to protect the structure. This important detail was previously missing, and it contributed to the water damage.

Installing self-adhesive flashing helps prevent any further rot to the rim joist. I was sure to leave a space of about 1/4 in. between the stoop and rim joist to allow for future drainage.

As a side note, I always make sure to keep my long projects weather-tight and secure, no matter what the forecast says! You don’t want to have any issues that could force you to pay for damages. Trust me.

I ran continuous beads of exterior-grade adhesive to the rim joist and studs.
I then installed new, 1/2-in. sheathing, which I cut to fit around the stoop. I left about 1/4 in. of a gap so that the sheathing wouldn’t rot, and to allow for proper drainage.
I also added 1/2-in. sheathing to the jambs to act as spacers.
I applied self-adhesive flashings in order to make the door opening watertight.
I started with the sill, and followed by adding corner flashings to each corner—these are called “bow ties” (see photo, right).

Then I installed both sides, repeating the same process at the top of the opening with more bow ties.

Instead of installing the unit into the opening and fussing with wood shims, I opted for a different approach. This different way made it easier, faster, and allowed me to work alone. I used deck screws as shims on each side to make my unit dead-plumb with no fussing.

First, I marked the location of the hinges onto the rough opening, and I marked the location of the top and bottom of the unit. Starting from the sill on the opening, I marked a center line in the middle, and then measured half the distance both ways to the outside dimension (O.D.) of the jamb—that’s where I’d start installing “shim screws”. I installed a pair of “shim screws” at each location, keeping them flat and spaced enough to catch the jamb’s width.

I began the shimming process from the bottom. I measured up 1 in. from the bottom location on the jamb, and I installed a pair of screws. To know how deep to set the screws, I set my speed square flat on the sill and held it on the mark I’d made for the O.D. of the jamb. I adjusted the screws until they touched the square. I prefer to use a screw gun rather than an impact—screw guns make it easier to set the screws. Once the bottom screws were set, I installed the next set of screws plumb to the bottom screws using a 2-ft. level. I continued in this manner up the jamb, using each previous set of screws as a starting point. Once I reached the top, I added a set of screws one inch below the top of the door unit.

When I completed the jamb side, I transferred all the screw locations to the other side and pre-set those screws. Then, I cut a board to the exact dimension of the door unit. Using this board as a guide, I set the screws across from each other to fit the board. The opening was then ready to receive the door unit.

Re-installing the Entry Door         

I always like to try to fit the door into the opening, just so I can be sure it fits before I lay beads of caulking on the sill and secure the unit.

In this case, the door fit perfectly. But at that point, I realized that I didn’t pre-drill holes into the jambs to secure the door! I made sure not to hit the shim screws. I then pre-set all the screws.
I ran two beads of sealant to the sill. This would help prevent water and drafts from entering. It would also help to stop any squeaks between the threshold and sill.
Installing a single door unit is a one-person job, but having one with sidelites requires an extra pair of hands. We dropped the unit into the opening, making sure the sill and fresh beads of caulking made a good seal. Then we tilted the unit into place.
Before securing the unit, we used a level to check for plumb, and we also made sure the unit was plumb off the house. This last part is very important so that the door doesn’t swing in either direction by itself.

Exterior Trim

I pre-assemble all my exterior trim, and I do it right on the jobsite. I use a small portable DeWalt table saw to rip the casing to width, so it will fit perfectly between the jamb and the siding.

I leave the casing legs long so I can use them as a story pole to lay out the entablature details—that includes the astragral molding, the frieze, and the crown.
On this job, I wanted to match the fluting to the original casing, so I laid out the flutes using a Trim Gauge. I like this tool a lot. It rides smoothly on the edge of a board, and it’s easy to adjust for different reveals.
I use a sled for cutting flutes—a technique I learned from Gary Katz (and which he learned from Jim Chestnut).
To stop all the flutes so the tops are perfectly straight, I attach a temporary stop to the casing leg. This is a pretty fool-proof system, and it’s fast.
With the sled set up and stops on both pieces of casing, I can run four flutes, one on each leg, for both the inside and the outside flutes, then adjust the sled to cut the inside flutes.
I pocket screw the legs to the frieze, and glue that joint, too.

Then I install the astragal moldings, which I also pre-assemble so that the miters are tight. The weather can be brutal where I live, deep freezing in the winter and high humidity in the summer, so I use PVC trim whenever possible—that way I never have to worry about coming back to a job for repairs. PVC isn’t affected by moisture content, only temperature. And with PVC cement, the miters are joined molecularly. I never have to caulk anything.

And another thing about PVC trim: I can sandwich endless pieces on top of each other without worrying about moisture getting trapped between the pieces and causing rot—after all, that’s why the people hired me in the first place, to fix the rot!
I build up the frieze from two boards, then wrap the crown molding around the top board so it terminates against the backboard, which makes it easy to butt into the existing siding. Just like the astragal molding, I start by cutting the miters and dry-fitting the pieces, then I pre-assemble the miters before attaching the crown.

Final Flashing

After securing the door unit into the opening, it was time to apply the outer layer of wall flashing.

We started from the bottom and worked our way up to the top, overlapping each piece by six inches. In order to prevent moisture from entering behind the siding, we needed to seal the wall flashing to the housewrap.

This is where most leaks start, and they can create serious rot due to improper sealing of the housewrap to the wall flashing. I applied the wall flashing to the door jamb, about 1/2 in. in from the edge of the jamb, leaving more than a 1/4-in. reveal. The back of the flashing lapped over the housewrap about 2 in.—this was to ensure that no moisture or water will enter the opening.

Since I pre-assembled my exterior trim as a unit, and made sure to measure correctly, installation was fast and accurate. Once we tilted the trim kit in place and checked the fit, it was ready to be fastened.

We secured the trim kit to the door and wall sheathing, making sure the head and side casings were plumb and level. I like to use screws rather than nails, because then I can be confident that the trim will stay secure, and that the joints will remain tight for years.

I installed a piece of flashing before adding the pre-assmbled plinth blocks. This flashing would help reduce any water from entering behind the stoop. I sealed the top edge of the flashing with housewrap tape, and left the bottom edge open for water to drain out.

Flashing the Head

I don’t own a brake, but sometimes I wish I did—especially for custom trim like the deep entablature above this door. I needed a piece of aluminum bent, and I wasn’t going to rent a brake for just one piece! So I decided to make a jig from a scrap piece of plywood, and I fastened that to my worktable.

I measured out two lines 90 degrees to each other for the lengths I needed. Each line’s measurement equaled the exact width of the piece of flashing. Using my jigsaw, and a very steady hand, I cut each line to its exact distance. If the cuts were off, I wouldn’t be able to make the piece I wanted. I had to be sure my cuts were perfect.

Once my cuts were done, I simply curled the piece of flashing, inserting one corner first, and slowly forming the piece into the jig until both outer edges of flashing—along with the inside edge—were in the jig about an inch. Then it was just a matter of pulling the piece of flashing through the jig, and forming the piece of flashing I needed.
I secured the flashing above the head using builder’s tape. I could have used another piece of Vycor, but I figured the housewrap would also cover the top leg of the flashing.
After the metal flashing was secured, I pulled the housewrap back down and trimmed it to fit. I then tied in the siding.

Before leaving, I caulked a few joints to be sure the door was complete and ready for the homeowner to paint (again).

Comments/Discussion

53 Responses to “Repairing a Rotten Door Entry”

  1. Chris Knighton

    Great article Manny!

    You certainly do fine work and the shim screws idea is fantastic!

    What I’d really like to see if you have time is photos of your truck. That looks nice!

    Chris

    Reply
  2. Emanuel

    Thanks Chris,
    I’m glad you enjoyed the article. I’ll ask Gary if its ok and when.

    Thanks Again
    Emanuel

    Reply
  3. Yannis Tsakiris

    Good job Manny. I have come across a few your articles in the past and have enjoyed them as well because it seems that you write about the the challenging pain in the but jobs which is great because I like you get regularly and welcome the challenge to make another customer happy with quality job regardless of how fussy it maybe or particular they may be.
    Keep them coming and yes send picts of the truck. I just a sprinter for myself which very well stocked and have old chevy box diesel that am considering selling for Mitsubishi with custom body.

    Thanks again
    Yannis Tsakiris
    http://www.citypropertiesinc.net
    http://www.citydecksinc.com

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thank you, hope the info helps you on some of your upcoming projects.

      thanks again
      Emanuel

      Reply
  4. Gary Katz

    Ironically, I have some pictures and video of Manny’s truck…yep, I was pretty impressed with his setup, too! I’ll put it together and get Manny to write us a description.
    Gary

    Reply
  5. Yannis Tsakiris

    Hi Gary… I new we could rely on you.
    Oh by the we met at the Hamilton Lumber Yard in NJ earlier this year. I did buy the Kapex and I have to tell it’s simply a dream. I personally use it for everything. My crew uses the 10″ Makita slider. It so easy to move around up/down several flights of steps set up is easy and it’s been dean on accurate since it came out of the box.

    Thanks again.
    Yannis Tsakiris
    http://www.citypropertiesinc.net
    http://www.citydecksinc.com

    Reply
  6. Joseph in Los Angeles

    Great article! I love how thoroughly it documented both what can be done wrong as well as demonstrating how to do it right!

    I also “pre-plumb” my rough openings, but I do it with paired tapered shims. I like the solid support a pair of shims gives me to prevent the jamb from twisting.
    I first identify where the hinges are located (typical locations are already marked on my long level); then I plumb top and bottom locations; then I fill in the middle. I hold the shims in place with 18ga brads.
    Once one side ( hinge side, typ) is installed, I can set the rest of the jamb using the door reveals in pla
    .

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Joseph, I’m glad you enjoyed the article. I like that tip on marking the level. I’ll do that on my next door installation.

      Thanks Again
      Emanuel

      Reply
  7. Joseph in Los Angeles

    ..once one side of the jamb (hinged, typ) is set, I can install and adjust the rest of the jamb in place using the door reveals.

    I have one question in the waterproofing technique: in the photo, it appears that you are laying two continuous beads with closed ends on top of the sill.
    Doesn’t this have the potential to trap water inside the loop of sealant?
    I was taught to lay one solid bead towards the interior that also runs up the sides of rough opening.

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Hi Joseph, I’ve done this technique in different ways ( with clapboard for pitched sill, with one bead and also with two beads sealant). I also rolled up vycor to itself as a gasket to sealed the bottom of the door. These all worked great with no issues. Having what I done on this door prevented any moisture or water from entering the loop.

      Thanks
      Emanuel

      Reply
  8. Karlen

    Nice job. One questionmark though. Sandwiching organic material between two layers of flashing, isn’t that prone for moisture to stay an ultimately root?

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Hi Karlen, Thanks for reading my article. I’ve been flashing doors and windows this way for about 15 yrs and haven’t had any moisture or water problems. Most of my customers are repeat business so I’m back their several times for different projects and I never see any issues with my previous work regarding windows or doors that have been done for years.

      Thanks
      Emanuel

      Reply
  9. kreg McMahon

    great article really learned alot from reading this, thanks for taking the time to put this together…

    the sled is a great idea… see you at JLC Live

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Kreg, Glad you enjoyed it. Hope your staying busy during these tough times. see you at JLC Live.

      Thanks
      Emanuel

      Reply
  10. albert

    thanks for the idea of forming the flashing and you did a fantastic job . my compliments

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks for reading. Sometimes we have to be creative in order to save or make money and feel good about ourselves.

      Emanuel

      Reply
  11. Scott

    I appreciate the detail in this article.

    How many hours did you put into the project?

    How did you bib the job. T&M?

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Scott, The job took us about five days. I always find myself spending a couple hours a day on set up and clean up which makes these jobs take longer to do. We didn’t plan on the rotten rim joist and also we did a good amount of siding repair work around the whole door unit. I bid the job at a set price and billed for any additional work which I mentioned.

      Thanks for reading
      Emanuel

      Reply
  12. Justin

    Great article, love the attention to detail and the thorough explanation of each step. Just curious, What happened to the pediment?? And do you have to have the Festool router because of the mounting plates in order to have a sled?

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Justin, I have the pediment in my storage with all my other saved materials.You never know when your going to need it. I’m not sure on the mounting plates, maybe Gary can answer that.

      Thanks
      Emanuel

      Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Tom, Glad your enjoying reading the articles and hope their helpful for you.

      Thanks
      Emanuel

      Reply
  13. José Mota

    May I infer if some of you, there, are portuguese, or else, descendents of portuguese people.? Anyway, the reasom why I´m writing this is about your work: it´s look like well done.

    Greetings from Porto-Portugal

    José Mota

    Reply
  14. Sonny Wiehe

    Overall, a nicely detailed repair job Emanuel!…from the sill up.

    We do many repair jobs like this and I have a couple of critical thoughts and questions about what is detailed below the door sill in your article:

    1. Why use pressure treated for band board replacement? P.T. generally has a higher moisture content from the yard than s.p.f. framing lumber– and you are going to get more shrinkage in width. The original construction would generally not call for p.t.; why use it here?–and with a double vapor barrier as one reader called attention to? It seems that dry framing lumber would be more advantageous here because of the shrinkage issue and the fact that Grace I&W will bond better to dry rather than wet stock. Besides, why use the I&W over P.T. if you think outside moisture will rot what it is supposed to be protecting?
    2. Your existing stoop is covering a key area of band board and foundation sill plate (sure looks like from the photograph that the foundation wall is a full 6″ or so below finish stoop). Future water penetrating here would be a real concern for me*. Also, unless you gained access from crawl or basement to clip the band to joists and sill, you lack a good structural connection to existing floor system in this area.
    3. Lastly, you note that you leave a 1/4″ gap between stoop and band sheathing for drainage. Seems to me, this would be your only opportunity for stopping that moisture penetration you should be concerned about. I would at least consider backer rod and a quality polyurethane sealant (like Vulkem 110) here.

    Finally, budget is always a real factor for any remodel job…. but you point out that your client was hiring you to fix things “right”. How could you even consider taking on (not to mention warranting) a job like this unless the customer also paid you to remove and replace the overlapping masonry stoop that partially covers the structural wood floor system?

    William “Sonny” Wiehe Jr.

    *If you somehow shimmied that I&W down behind that stoop and pressed it tight up against your new band and existing floor system sill plates for a good weather seal (maybe without pointing it our in your article), then you are a true carpentry magician… and my critique on this point is unwarranted.

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Sonny, Thanks for all your concerns including the positive one. We in this trade have to repair each project we come across in the best possible way with a budget to follow (but budget wasn’t an issue here).
      Today’s PT wood doesn’t have as much moisture as it did years ago. Cutting the rim joist and fitting it tightly with metal connectors and structural screws help keep it in place. We installed the sheathing a little higher than the rim joist acting as support for the sub floor with glue and screws. This helps keep the door unit from moving, I haven’t had a door move yet.
      Having used the I.W was necessary because there was no sheathing covering the rim joist from behind the stoop and yes I did get a tight, smooth seal behind the stoop because I used a flat piece of aluminum to press the I.W to the rim joist, but if any moisture did enter there is where the PT will come in handy. My number one goal at that point was to keep the rim joist and sheathing as dry as possible so if any water or moisture gets down behind the stoop it can drain down and run off the I.W. Also having the I.W helps prevent leaks from any fasteners nailed through it like my kick board below the door sill.
      Regarding the stoop, we fastened all the joists to the rim joist and connected both ends with metal plates. Just behind the stoop where the house meets there, is a space lower than the sill where any water falls it will drain in both directions outward.
      Regarding the gap any sealant or backer rod in my mind is a way to trap moisture and cause the problems here all over again. We need things to drain not penetrate into our homes.
      The stoop did not need to be removed. Like I mentioned earlier we have to repair any type of project to the best of our knowledge. Doing all the steps (and more than needed) I feel very comfortable and pleased that this entry door will stand solid and dry with many years of entering and exiting.
      Thanks for reading Sonny, Hope I answered all your questions and some.
      Emanuel

      Reply
  15. Eric Tavitian

    Manny you did a great job with this “Sow’s Ear”. I grew up in the Boston area and cut my teeth with this type of repair.

    Reply
  16. Noel

    Nice job Emanuel.

    I don’t know if others commented on this but the stoop was a red flag for me. There is still an opportunity for water to do some unseen damage.

    I had a similar situation in my back stoop. I didn’t remove the entire stoop, but I used a nice piece of 20 inch flashing at the bottom of the door and behind the stoop.

    Otherwise, the project was done methodically with a lot of attention to details.

    Excellent work.

    Noel

    Reply
  17. Emanuel

    Thanks Noel, I ran the self adhering flashing behind the stoop past the sill about an inch plus having a space between the stoop and house leaves enough space for water to drain in both directions. (left and right)

    Emanuel

    Reply
  18. Aaron

    Great work on repairing that entrance door, it is amazing what some contractors will leave out just to get it done and paid not having longevity in mind.
    Clean up is quite essential as well, I’ll try to practice that more often on my projects.
    Thnx
    Yes I to would like pics of your truck

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks for the kind words. Yes clean up is very important on all jobsites. We do a quick clean up and organize our tools every hour which helps run our jobs smoothly and also makes clean up at the end of the day very easy.

      Thanks again
      Emanuel

      Reply
  19. Andy

    Great article I have been looking for something like this I have a similar problem I noticed a trickle of water in my basement during a storm. I pulled back the insulation to see the back of my concrete porch that was poured against the house with no flashing. The sheathing is completely rotted away. I’m going to be selling the house so I need to have it repaired. I didn’t see where you work out of. Do you do any work in the Maryland area or know anyone in that area you would recommend for the project?

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Andy, I’m glad you enjoyed the article. I’m up in Massachusetts and don’t know anybody in your area, but thanks for the offer. Hope you find someone.

      Emanuel

      Reply
  20. David Tuttle

    First of all thanks for the great article I’ve seen the same problem several times now I have more fire power to do a better job.

    Second, the jig for forming the flashing, if I understand what you did was just make the shape in the plywood and all you did was pull the piece through? it sounds too easy and really makes me look dumb for some of my solutions over the years.

    And I’ll second the I’d like a look at your truck set up.

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks David,

      The jig is very useful in my line of work, that I keep it with me at all times. You never know when your going to need it.

      Thanks again
      Emanuel

      Reply
  21. Doug

    Thanks for this informative and thorough treatment of a common carpentry problem. Rotten rim joists are no joke. Even for serious DIY homeowners like me, touching a serious structural problem such as this is usually out of the question, but seeing how it should be done helps when sizing up a carpenter during the bid and evaluation process.

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Doug, I’m glad you enjoyed the article and hopefully it will be helpful to you.

      Thanks again
      Emanuel

      Reply
  22. Micha

    Thanks for this article with photos, Emanuel! I think we are looking at having to do this repair for our back door in south Georgia. Do you know about how much we are looking at in terms of cost to repair by a third party?

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Micha,
      I’m glad you found this article useful. A job like this one not including the materials and additional work runs a couple of thousand in my area. Just make sure to flash properly which will prevent future problems like this one did.

      Thanks for reading,
      Emanuel

      Reply
  23. Victor

    Wow!! I love the fact that you applied the flashing everywhere water was an issue. I’m in the process of doing the same repair to a rotten Rim Joist, Studs, Sheathing and Sub-Floor. All caused by the lack of flashing. My builder filled the space between the stoop and Rim Joist with sheathing. I’m not sure how to flash this area where stoop meets house. The Sill Plate is lower than the stoop, and I’m thinking that any water that flows down there will eventually find it’s way to the basement ceiling. Can I use the flashing tape to overlap onto the concrete and then cover that with the trim piece under the door?

    Thanks,

    Victor

    Reply
  24. Emanuel

    Thanks Victor.

    My guess is that using the flashing tape onto the concrete will eventually deteriorate over time. If there is space between the lower edge of the sill and stoop, I would try to slide a piece of metal flashing between the stoop and sheathing. Use a long sawzall blade to help shave down some of the sheathing which will help the metal flashing slide in easier. Now the space I’m talking about acts as a gutter which will lead the water out on both sides of the stoop. I would then counter flash from the house onto the stoop adding flexible sealant to seal the flashing down onto the stoop. Doing this gives me piece of mind if the sealant ever fails.

    Hope this helps and thanks for reading
    Emanuel

    Reply
  25. Gene

    Emanuel,

    Great article and pictures! I was wondering if I can get your opinion. We have a sliding door in the rear of our house that goes to a 2 step stoop, then down to the patio. The step down from the sliding door to the stoop is about 6 inches. The kick board underneath the sill is rotting (I assume it’s pine) and is about 4 1/2 wide (high) and sits on about 1 inch of concrete filler. I have not taken off the kick board to see what’s behind it but assuming there is good flashing, what are my next steps? Should I put an aluminum flashing like you did under the new kick board and put in new concrete filler at the bottom where it meets the stoop? And do you nail in the kickboard to the flashing / sheathing or use a strong adhesive? Also, what are your thoughts on using either cellular PVC trim or Azek for a kick board? Thanks for any suggestions.

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Hi Gene,
      I would remove the kick board and install a piece of aluminum flashing onto the sheathing and over the concrete filler. Make sure to install a piece of flashing tape on the top leg of the flashing. This flashing tape will seal the screws you use to install the PVC kick board and make sure to leave a space between the kick board and stoop.

      Thanks for reading
      Emanuel

      Reply
  26. Luke

    Hello, just wondering if you installed a new door here or reused the existing one? I sometimes have trouble figuring when to reuse and when to just get new. Nice article by the way. Thanks.

    Luke

    Reply
  27. Emanuel

    Glad you enjoyed the article. Sometimes I reinstall existing doors if their in good shape, which most of the time it ends up taking more time fussing with. Existing doors over time are out of line with their jamb units and sometimes the door slab is twisted which makes them even harder to install correctly. This was a new door unit, which made installation easier and faster, which left the client with a better product.

    Emanuel

    Reply
  28. Al

    This is an excellent video it has helped me tackle my side door problem with the wood rotting at the bottom of the door. This step by step process showed me how to do it properly and insure it won’t happen again. I look forward watching other videos you have made that can assist me in repairing things around the house. Thank you once again for taking the time providing this information.

    Reply
  29. Will Jones

    Came across your well done upload seeking tips for deep rot repair.

    Carpenter alert – forgive my chiming in.

    Specializing in doorhanging for 35 years I recommend (as noted above) only “paired” Eastern White Cedar shims to “tune” and square the finish frame like a Steinway with a full-length Stabila and 16p casing nails properly angled and placed: it can be humanly “perfect” until the Final Trump sounds…”Old School.”

    A good carpenter does it by himself.

    Given the novel use of “shim” screws, filling the void with polyurethane foam afterwards – which should be used regardless for insulation and adhesion – is the only way to now match the rigidity and strength (“section modulus”) of the traditional way. imj

    A good carpenter learns something new every day.

    Thanks again – You do great work, way past me.

    Reply
    • Emanuel

      Thanks Will. I’m glad you enjoyed the article. I’m always looking for new ways to get the job done faster with better results.

      Thanks again for reading
      Emanuel

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Attn: New spam-protection!
Slide the tool icon, below, to the right (select and drag, with your mouse) in order to "unlock" the Submit Comment button.

Please note: Your first comment will be held for moderation/review by our staff before it appears. After you have one comment approved, all of your subsequent comments will appear immediately. Read our comment policy for more information.